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Old February 14th, 2014, 08:42 AM
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Re: 5 books read on the top of your mind

Quote:
Originally Posted by motowner View Post
Some of the books that come to mind:

1) Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand: This one is at the top of my list at all times.


Others in no particular order:
  • Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts: Incredible real life story of an Australian fugitive in the streets of Bombay. Its a long book (900+ pages), so if you are into it, get the audio book version. The audio narration is amazing and you'll look forward to your commute to work.
  • Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg: Don't like to read self improvement books, but made an exception for this based on reviews and didn't regret it.
  • Daemon by Daniel Suarez: If you work in IT and like sci-fi novels, this is a must read! I even read the two sequels to this book, but didn't like them as much as this one.
  • Freakonomics and SuperFreakonomics by Levitt and Dubner: Got me interested in a subject that I used to find excruciatingly boring. Became a fan of the authors - follow their blog posts and podcasts as well.
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson: If, like me, you have slept through your science/history lessons in school or ratta maroed answers and regurgitated in exams, then this is a crash course in all the fascinating stuff you missed.
  • State of Fear by Michael Crichton: Wanna read an alternative viewpoint on global warming?

I was just browsing the reading list again, and this freakonomics came closest to a Business kind of a book. In 90s books by Iacoca, etc. used to be popular. Dont people read such anymore. I actually started on 'Made in Japan', by Akio Morita (founder of Sony). I liked the simple language he was using. Anyway, could not finish the book and lost it. This was about 15 years back.
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