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View Poll Results: Did British Save India From Islam?
Yes, certainly else India would have been bullied into Islam 5 50.00%
No, Muslims would have allowed Hindus to co-exist peacefully 0 0%
British were worse than Muslim rulers 3 30.00%
Others : Pls. expalin 2 20.00%
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  #1  
Old July 14th, 2012, 11:27 PM
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Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

Empire state of mind

July 15,2012


The fourth book in the ĎEmpire of the Moghulí series focuses on Akbarís son, Jahangir, and brings alive a battle-scarred time in history, writes M K Chandra bose


The Moghul era in Indian history has no dearth of spine-chilling episodes of savagery, intrigues and betrayal. It is a saga of a deadly cycle of sons plotting against fathers, brothers murdering brothers and empresses and concubines plotting, scheming and seducing.

Succession was never smooth and eliminating any potential threat from the siblings was an overriding priority for an emperor. In the Moghul warrior code, might was always right, with the strongest taking all. ĎThrone or coffiní was their motto, handed down from generation to generation. This legacy of bloodshed and passionate interludes could be an ideal backdrop for any fast-paced thriller.

The Empire of the Moghul series recreate the milieu with all the drama associated with a dynasty ruling over one-sixth of humanity, endless struggle for power, machinations and jealousy, insecurity amidst opulence and splendour and loneliness of power. Alex Rutherford is the pen name of the British husband-wife team of Michael and Diana Preston. The Moghul series is their first work of historical fiction. It was while researching on Taj Mahal that the duo got interested in the period.

Exhaustive research for the work took them from many Moghul monuments in the sub-continent to Central Asia, Iran and Afghanistan. The wealth of chronicles on the era and letters from foreign visitors proved handy. The result is a quintet of fascinating novels covering over two centuries.

The first in the series, Raiders from the North, tells the story of the nomadic warrior Babur, the first Moghul Emperor. The second novel, Brothers at War, is about Baburís son Humayun. The third one, Ruler of the World, covers the epochal reign of Akbar the great. The fourth novel, The Tainted Throne, is about Akbarís son Jahangir. The fifth and final one covering the Shah Jahan era is in the pipeline.

The Tainted Throne brings alive 17th century India with its many fratricidal battles involving vast armies, hurtling the empire down the path of self-destruction. It is a story of filial betrayal, jealousy, distrust and conspiracy in full play. At the outset, readers come face to face with the battle between Jahangirís troops and his son Khusrao, who has revolted against him. Jahangir ruthlessly puts down the revolt, meting out brutal punishments to his son and his cohorts. Soon, he begins grooming his favourite son Khurram (Shah Jahan) as his successor. However, everything changes as Mehrunisa (Nur Jahan) enters Jahangirís life.

He brings Nur Jahan to his harem after getting her husband murdered, to wed her later. She uses her enticing assets with deadly, effect making the mighty Moghul emperor dance to her tunes. She revels in encouraging jealousies and rivalries among Jahangirís sons to extend her influence. After encouraging Jahangirís addiction to wine and opium, Nur Jahan takes control of the matters of state, much to the chagrin of the elders. She also gets her daughter Ladli, from her first marriage, to marry Jahangirís youngest son, and plots to crown him the next emperor. She engineers a rift between Shah Jahan and Jahangir, forcing the prince to flee.

Though all major characters are historical figures, and the main events and battles depicted are real, the authors fill the gaps with their fertile imagination. Rather than great historical figures, they are depicted as plain human beings with raw emotions. The fall of Jahangir from glory after his finding refuge in opium and wine, feeling of loneliness and vacillation in the face of a power-hungry wifeís prodding are vividly presented. He emerges as an impulsive ruler who relishes the sight of men being skinned alive or crushed beneath the feet of elephants. Nur Jahanís transformation from a loving wife to an omnipotent power behind the throne, dabbling in everything that matters, makes her an unforgettable figure. Gender is no handicap to her. Some of the intimate scenes involving her are salacious.


The hallmark of the novel is its deft characterisation. The behaviour of Moghul courtiers is not different from modern day sycophants surrounding seats of power. The battle scenes, presented in graphic detail, have a touch of authenticity, obviously the result of painstaking research. The horrors of the war, and unspeakable cruelty shown to the vanquished, epitomise a reign that began in blood. We also have a glimpse of the crafty British trying to get a foothold in India with proposals of trade to Jahangir.

The reader never loses interest in the narrative as each event and episode unfolds methodically and evocatively. The grand spectacle of Moghul wealth, the glitzy court, palaces built in milk-white marbles and red sandstones, the rustle of silk and the glitter of gold and diamonds, the exquisite cuisine of the era, the shenanigans in the harem all flit before us. The passionate episodes and action scenes together make the novel all the more riveting. A handy book for anyone interested in the Moghul era.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/...tate-mind.html
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  #2  
Old July 15th, 2012, 06:44 AM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

No,
By the time the British came, the moughal empire was dead. It had only a few areas of power, Delhi, Lahore and a few nawab estates.
The north was ruled by the Sikhs and the south was ruled by the Marathas.
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Old July 15th, 2012, 08:00 AM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

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Originally Posted by Master Bates View Post
No,
By the time the British came, the moughal empire was dead. It had only a few areas of power, Delhi, Lahore and a few nawab estates.
The north was ruled by the Sikhs and the south was ruled by the Marathas.
By the time the British came, Marathas were one of power centers (instead of major power center), having lost third battle of Panipat with Ahmadshah Abdali...Sikhs were powerful, but had not empire expanding aims/vision; then there was Hyder Ali and Nizam in south, and many scattered Nawabs (fiefdoms) across the country. Rajputs were also in scattered local fiefdoms. By and large, Muslims populace was wealthy and powerful compared to Hindu populace. If British did not arrive, Portuguese, Dutch, and French would have ruled the country. Observe how Portuguese, Dutch and French colonies turned out after they gained independence...with exception of Brazil (which had no pre-existing literate civilization/culture that benefited the modernization), there are no honorable mentions

The greatest benefit of British was that they allowed gradual modernization of India along with bringing technological progress to many corners of the country (of course, for their own exploitative benefit). The education system enforced on India (no matter how much we hate it currently) helped it rid of obsolete religion based education. For example, the Hindu education system of that time did not allow for an intelligent Brahmin to apply his intelligence to architecture, engineering or weaponry as that was the work of craftsmen. The only outlets (besides politics, religious practices, and civil administration) left to intelligent Brahmins was mathematics, astronomy (much of it being astrology) and medicine.
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Old July 15th, 2012, 08:29 PM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

If the British were not in India, maybe the Hindu kings would have wiped out Islam from India? The Marathas, Rajputs and the Sikhs would have eventually united due to new communication systems and probably could have erased Islam from India?

The techniques of Muslim rulers which primarily were ruthlessness, deceit and gore were adopted by the time of the Shivaji and other Hindu kings.
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Old July 16th, 2012, 09:14 AM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

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If the British were not in India, maybe the Hindu kings would have wiped out Islam from India? The Marathas, Rajputs and the Sikhs would have eventually united due to new communication systems and probably could have erased Islam from India?

The techniques of Muslim rulers which primarily were ruthlessness, deceit and gore were adopted by the time of the Shivaji and other Hindu kings.
Yeah right

http://www.rajasthan-tour-package.ne...sRelations.htm
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Old July 19th, 2012, 08:35 PM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

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Originally Posted by dhurandhar View Post
The Rajputs were the servants of the Mughals. To destroy them would mean destruction of the Mughals. The good Rajputs were few like Maharana Pratap. But if the Muslims were weakened by the Marathas the Rajputs would have revolted at an opportune time for sure.

Take an example of how loyal the Rajput were as servants of the Muslims.

The Battle of Patan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Patan
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Last edited by viking; July 19th, 2012 at 08:40 PM.
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Old July 20th, 2012, 07:57 AM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

It was the same situation in the North were most of the battles of Sikh's were not against the Mughals but the local hindu hill rajas (rajputs) who were allies of the mughals.

Infact, it was the same hill rajas (rajputs) that after losing time and time again against the Sikhs, went to the Mughals for help against the Sikhs.


Below is the battles of the 10th Sikh Guru, Gobind Singh against the rajputs/mughals:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Anandpur
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Anandpur


Conflicts with the Rajas of Sivalik Hills

The formation of the military order Khalsa did not go well with the Rajas of the Sivalik Hills, who in turn got united to evict the Guru from the region. However their expeditions during 1700-04 were unsuccessful.
Balia Chand and Alim Chand - two of the hill chieftains - made a surprise attack on the Guru, while he was on a hunting expedition.[16] In the ensuing combat, Alim Chand managed to escape, while Balia Chand was killed by Guru's aide Ude Singh.
After several failed attempts to check the rising power of the Sikhs, the hill chiefs petitioned the Mughal rulers for help. The Mughal emperor of Delhi sent his generals Din Beg and Painda Khan, each with an army of five thousand men.[17] The Mughal forces were joined by the armies of the hill chiefs. However, they failed to defeat the Guru's forces, and Painda Khan was killed in the First Battle of Anandpur (1701).
Alarmed at the Guru's rising influence, the Rajas of several hill states assembled at Bilaspur to discuss the situation. The son of Bhim Chand, Raja Ajmer Chand of Kahlur, suggested forming an alliance to curb the Guru's rising power. Accordingly, the Rajas formed an alliance, and marched towards Anandpur. They sent a letter to the Guru, asking him to pay the arrears of rent for Anandpur (which lay in Ajmer Chand's territory), and leave the place. The Guru insisted that the land was bought by his father, and is therefore, his own property. A battle, dated from 1701 to 1704, followed. The hill Rajas were joined by a large number of Gujjars, under the command of Jagatullah. Duni Chand led five hundred men from Majha region to assist the Guru. Reinforcements from other areas also arrived to help the Guru. The conflict, known as the Second Battle of Anandpur, resulted in retreat of the hill Rajas.[18]
Later, the hill Rajas negotiated a peace agreement with the Guru, asking him to leave Anandpur. Accordingly, the Guru left for Nirmoh village.[19] Seeing that Nirmoh was not fortified, Raja Ajmer Chand and the Raja of Kangra launched an attack on the Guru's camp. However, they were not able to defeat the Guru. Meanwhile, Raja Ajmer Chand had sent his envoys to the Mughal viceroys in Sirhind and Delhi, seeking their help against the Guru. The army of Sirhind viceroy Wazir Khan arrived to assist the hill Rajas. The assault by Wazir Khan's army forced the Guru to retreat to Basoli, whose Raja was on good terms with the Guru.
After staying for a few days at Basoli, the Guru marched back to Anandpur, and the local Rajas decided to make peace with him. However, after two years the hostilities between the Rajas and the Guru reappeared. Raja Ajmer Chand allied with the Rajas of Hindur, Chamba and Fatehpur, and attacked Anandpur in 1703-04. They failed to oust the Guru in the Third Battle of Anandpur, and retreated.
After repeated pleas for assistance from the hill Rajas, the Mughal emperor sent an army under Saiyad Khan's command. Saiyad Khan was a brother-in-law of Pir Budhu Shah, and defected to the Guru's side, after the Pir spoke highly of him. Ramzan Khan then took the command of the imperial army, and allied with the hill Rajas to attack Anandpur in March 1704. It was the crop-cutting time of the year, and the majority of the Guru's followers had dispersed to their homes. Guru was assisted by two of his Muslim admirers, Maimun Khan and Saiyad Beg, however his men were outnumbered, and decided to vacate Anandpur.[20] The Mughal army plundered the city, and then proceeded to Sirhind. On their way back, they were caught in a surprise attack by the Guru's forces, who recovered the booty captured from Anandpur. The Guru then returned to Anandpur.
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Old July 22nd, 2012, 08:49 PM
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Re: Were British Saviours Of India From Muslim Tyranny?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Master Bates View Post
It was the same situation in the North were most of the battles of Sikh's were not against the Mughals but the local hindu hill rajas (rajputs) who were allies of the mughals.

Infact, it was the same hill rajas (rajputs) that after losing time and time again against the Sikhs, went to the Mughals for help against the Sikhs.


Below is the battles of the 10th Sikh Guru, Gobind Singh against the rajputs/mughals:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Anandpur
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Anandpur


Conflicts with the Rajas of Sivalik Hills

The formation of the military order Khalsa did not go well with the Rajas of the Sivalik Hills, who in turn got united to evict the Guru from the region. However their expeditions during 1700-04 were unsuccessful.
Balia Chand and Alim Chand - two of the hill chieftains - made a surprise attack on the Guru, while he was on a hunting expedition.[16] In the ensuing combat, Alim Chand managed to escape, while Balia Chand was killed by Guru's aide Ude Singh.
After several failed attempts to check the rising power of the Sikhs, the hill chiefs petitioned the Mughal rulers for help. The Mughal emperor of Delhi sent his generals Din Beg and Painda Khan, each with an army of five thousand men.[17] The Mughal forces were joined by the armies of the hill chiefs. However, they failed to defeat the Guru's forces, and Painda Khan was killed in the First Battle of Anandpur (1701).
Alarmed at the Guru's rising influence, the Rajas of several hill states assembled at Bilaspur to discuss the situation. The son of Bhim Chand, Raja Ajmer Chand of Kahlur, suggested forming an alliance to curb the Guru's rising power. Accordingly, the Rajas formed an alliance, and marched towards Anandpur. They sent a letter to the Guru, asking him to pay the arrears of rent for Anandpur (which lay in Ajmer Chand's territory), and leave the place. The Guru insisted that the land was bought by his father, and is therefore, his own property. A battle, dated from 1701 to 1704, followed. The hill Rajas were joined by a large number of Gujjars, under the command of Jagatullah. Duni Chand led five hundred men from Majha region to assist the Guru. Reinforcements from other areas also arrived to help the Guru. The conflict, known as the Second Battle of Anandpur, resulted in retreat of the hill Rajas.[18]
Later, the hill Rajas negotiated a peace agreement with the Guru, asking him to leave Anandpur. Accordingly, the Guru left for Nirmoh village.[19] Seeing that Nirmoh was not fortified, Raja Ajmer Chand and the Raja of Kangra launched an attack on the Guru's camp. However, they were not able to defeat the Guru. Meanwhile, Raja Ajmer Chand had sent his envoys to the Mughal viceroys in Sirhind and Delhi, seeking their help against the Guru. The army of Sirhind viceroy Wazir Khan arrived to assist the hill Rajas. The assault by Wazir Khan's army forced the Guru to retreat to Basoli, whose Raja was on good terms with the Guru.
After staying for a few days at Basoli, the Guru marched back to Anandpur, and the local Rajas decided to make peace with him. However, after two years the hostilities between the Rajas and the Guru reappeared. Raja Ajmer Chand allied with the Rajas of Hindur, Chamba and Fatehpur, and attacked Anandpur in 1703-04. They failed to oust the Guru in the Third Battle of Anandpur, and retreated.
After repeated pleas for assistance from the hill Rajas, the Mughal emperor sent an army under Saiyad Khan's command. Saiyad Khan was a brother-in-law of Pir Budhu Shah, and defected to the Guru's side, after the Pir spoke highly of him. Ramzan Khan then took the command of the imperial army, and allied with the hill Rajas to attack Anandpur in March 1704. It was the crop-cutting time of the year, and the majority of the Guru's followers had dispersed to their homes. Guru was assisted by two of his Muslim admirers, Maimun Khan and Saiyad Beg, however his men were outnumbered, and decided to vacate Anandpur.[20] The Mughal army plundered the city, and then proceeded to Sirhind. On their way back, they were caught in a surprise attack by the Guru's forces, who recovered the booty captured from Anandpur. The Guru then returned to Anandpur.
The Rajputs as servants are the most loyal of all tribes. The Muslims had recognised this trait and hence decided to employ them as slaves.
India would have been freed of the Muslim tyranny if it was not for the loyal slaves of the Muslims who carried the green flag high.
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