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View Poll Results: What do educated Russians think of Putin's United Russia party?
It's dictatorship 1 20.00%
Most educated Russians don't care 1 20.00%
It's perfectly democratic 0 0%
The bad press this party got is US propaganda 4 80.00%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 5. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1  
Old November 26th, 2011, 12:41 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Putin urges his party to do its best in polls

Moscow, Nov 25 (IANS/RIA Novosti) Russian Prime Minister has urged members of the ruling United Russia party to obtain maximum results at the Dec 4 parliamentary elections.

Putin said what was now going on in Europe and US, and the economic situation there, resulted from the lack of consensus in their societies, when political leaders cannot join forces and work together.

'I hope this situation will not occur in our country. That's why there's a necessity to obtain maximum results at these elections,' Putin told party members Thursday.

The prime minister outlined the core principles that the party must follow in the new parliament -- social-oriented decisions, shrewd budget policy and broad public discussions on key bills.

Putin also called on the opposition to 'behave calmly' and not create obstacles for the ruling party in governance.

United Russia's ratings have slumped in recent months. A public poll this month showed that 40 percent of respondents planned to vote for United Russia -- down from over 60 percent last month.

United Russia will Nov 27 nominate Putin as its candidate for president, a party official said.

http://in.news.yahoo.com/putin-urges...220328435.html
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  #2  
Old November 27th, 2011, 02:49 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: Putin's survival

Mods can you change the title to 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?
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  #3  
Old November 28th, 2011, 08:15 AM
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

are we talking of the same 'Lilli' Putin ?
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  #4  
Old November 28th, 2011, 04:15 PM
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Seriously !! Your topics take the cake !!
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  #5  
Old November 29th, 2011, 07:29 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Is the Russian public mature enough to understand that although Putin is power hungry his governance is not autocratic in nature? Is Russian public smart enough to not get influenced by US sponsored Russian media’s propaganda? Or is it stupid like Indian public which worships Anna Hazare?
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  #6  
Old November 29th, 2011, 09:20 PM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

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Originally Posted by shruthi_ks View Post
Is the Russian public mature enough to understand that although Putin is power hungry his governance is not autocratic in nature? Is Russian public smart enough to not get influenced by US sponsored Russian media’s propaganda? Or is it stupid like Indian public which worships Anna Hazare?
Russia is population deficient country and it's population is continues to diminish. USA is the richest country in the world having half of world's total wealth. So USA has the capacity to buy every single citizen of Russia.
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  #7  
Old December 15th, 2011, 02:29 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Manmohan has obligation only towards Putin. Bhaad main jaye Indians. Aise bewakoof aur kamine log deserve to die in hot climate famines. And Manmohan himself could have settled in US at his daughter’s home.

Manmohan sought Russia’s help and Putin is paying the price for assuring it. He made known his intentions to save India and the consequences are for all to see.

Russia’s general public never cared for democracy. Putin was very popular even during Medvedev’s president ship. There was negligible degree of complaint and that too was by his power hungry opponents. Suddenly there is ‘uprising’ since last one month. All of a sudden there are massive protests which were unheard of before. A new challenger leader emerges overnight.

Last edited by shruthi_ks; December 15th, 2011 at 04:09 AM.
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  #8  
Old December 15th, 2011, 05:18 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Mine are the most significant threads.
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  #9  
Old December 15th, 2011, 05:25 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

What will be Putin's fate? Asylum in some country? Or maybe those who are responsible for this, the West themselves may offer 'shelter'.
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  #10  
Old December 15th, 2011, 10:26 PM
kalkibhagwan kalkibhagwan is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

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Originally Posted by shruthi_ks View Post
What will be Putin's fate? Asylum in some country? Or maybe those who are responsible for this, the West themselves may offer 'shelter'.
you have gone mad, dont know which century you are talking about...
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  #11  
Old December 16th, 2011, 06:26 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

What is their tactics now? Are they trying to prove him mad???!!!

MOSCOW – Russians had not really seen Vladimir Putin since his ruling United Russia party was walloped, at least by Russian standards, in the Dec. 4 parliamentary elections. Since then, Moscow, and the rest of the country, had been rocked by anti-government -- and anti-Putin -- protests. Tens of thousands of previously politically inactive people pinned white ribbons to their coats and came out across Russia to contest the elections, expressing their displeasure at being treated like idiots by the Kremlin for the past decade. Up until Thursday, the Kremlin's reaction to this outpouring implied either panic, denial, or both. Putin remained well out of sight. He spoke through his spokesman in vague, contradictory statements, and, once, in a meeting of his People's Front, blamed the protests on U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, claiming she had sent Russians a certain "signal."

This self-imposed almost-silence ended today, in a four-and-half-hour telethon that marked Putin's first real public appearance since his glitsy thermidorian system started to unravel at the edges, and in it Putin made sure to address the outrage that drew more crowds to the streets than Russia has seen since 1993. Soothing words were not what he offered. "To be perfectly honest," he said, "when I saw something on some people's chests, I'll be honest -- it's not quite appropriate -- but in any case, I thought that this was part of an anti-AIDS campaign, that these were, pardon me, condoms."

Yes, that's right: in case Russians hadn't been offended by years of brazen maneuvers and bland television tailor-made for the lobotomized; in case they hadn't been insulted by the glib switcheroo of Sept.24, when Putin and his handpicked successor as president, Dmitri Medvedev, announced they would simply swap positions; in case the crudely falsified elections and the baton-happy police hadn't angered enough people; Putin compared their symbol of peaceful protest, those white ribbons neatly pinned on lapels, to an unwrapped and doubled-up condom. On live TV.

The Russian Internet, not surprisingly, was quick to fire back. First to circulate was a diaphanous condom in the shape of a folded ribbon; then came Putin standing stuffily in front of a Kremlin nightscape, an unraveled condom photoshopped onto his coat. ("Happy holidays, friends!" the postcard said.) Another web parody offered a prediction: a deficit of condoms in the city on the eve of Dec. 24, the day of the next scheduled protest. Sergei Parkhomenko, a journalist and one of the organizers of the upcoming demonstration, even proposed a new slogan for the rally: "You're the gondon." In Russian, gondon is slang for condom -- or asshole.

Putin hardly stopped with his condom remark. Over nearly five hours in a TV studio taking questions from his public as part of an annual ritual, he often returned to his favorite theme: Western conspiracies to weaken Russia, to "push it to the side," or, as he characterized the wave of protests now unfolding around him, "a well-tuned scheme to destabilize societies" that "doesn't come out of nowhere" -- like Ukraine's Orange Revolution. As for the protesters, Russia's once and would-be future president pointed out that "there are, of course, people who have the passport of a citizen of the Russian Federation, but act in the interests of a foreign government using foreign money. We have to try to find common ground with them, too, even though it's often pointless or impossible." And then there were the mere mercenaries in those peaceful protesting crowds. Putin said he knew that there were college students who received money to come to Saturday's 50,000-person protest -- "fine, let them earn a little money" -- even though the only college students reported to have received money were those populating the pro-Kremlin rallies of the last weeks. (I met one such young man, 23-year-old Mikhail, a member of the pro-Kremlin Nashi group who came with his opposition-minded friends to the anti-Kremlin protest on Bolotnaya Square. He told me had been paid to show up and talk people out of their anti-Putin sentiments. His logic explained Putin's, to some extent. "I get paid for my time," Mikhail told me, when I asked why he thought his friends were lying when they said they didn't get money from the U.S. State Department. "Why shouldn't they?")

Leaving aside the constant repetition of this trope, as well as that of the evil West (which "underestimates our nuclear rocket potential"), and evil America (which killed Qaddafi), and evil John McCain (who "has blood on his hands"), the one topic -- the "red thread," according to the host -- that Putin had to keep coming back to was Saturday's protests across Russia. He tried, as best as he could, to leave aside the issue after offering bland blanket statements about citizens' rights to express their views, as well as backhanded comments about the opposition, which, according to Putin, "will always say that elections were unfair. Always. It's a question of political culture."

But it kept coming back. For a while he tried to spin the protests. "There were different kinds of people there, and I was happy to see fresh, healthy, intelligent, energetic faces of people who were actively stating their position," he said. "If this is the result of the Putin regime, then I'm happy. I'm happy that these kinds of people are appearing." He said this twice, echoing the loyalist television celebrity Tina Kandelaki's statement that those who came out across the country were "Putin's generation," a crowd of middle-class democrats made possible by his policies. (A fine theory, if one disregards the frequency with which "Putin, resign!" rolled loudly through the crowds.)

Eventually, Putin did his best to try to dodge the issue. "For God's sake, if it's so interesting to you, then I'll discuss it," he said after the host gently steered him back to it. If it wasn't the host, it was the questioners themselves, who seemed less scripted than in previous years. And, if they weren't asking about the protests and the falsified elections, they were asking about the deafness and corruption of their local authorities. Putin offered some promises of reform: Direct election of governors -- eliminated in 2004 -- but only, as he put it, through "a presidential filter" (i.e., only those candidates vetted by the president -- him -- will be allowed to stand for election.) No new parliamentary elections -- which, of course, would be logistically impossible -- but webcams installed at polling stations at the next one.

Clearly, this was an uncomfortable new position for Putin. The live question-and-answer session, a marathon of good-tsar populism, is a longstanding tradition and is Putin's favorite format. For ten years, he has swanned through rehearsed, tee-ball questions from his adoring populace, using the occasion to graciously solve a crisis for an elderly veteran or punish an errant regional authority. He was used to being charming, confident, wry. He was Putin. This year, he approached this sublime state only when tossing figures and percentages around like confetti -- one Russian journalist called him a "random number generator." For the most part, he was less than fluent. He stumbled. He interrupted people with jittery, flat jokes. His spin sounded less like spin, and more like the excuses of a truant caught red-handed. He was, in short, nervous.

And yet, there was little Putin could do with his nervousness aside from channel it into insults (see: condoms) and paranoia (see: foreign funds). This is a telling response, and representative of the state's reaction to the post-election furor: some dubious concessions -- like removing the infamous Duma speaker Boris Gryzlov and promoting Kremlin ideologue-in-chief Vladislav Surkov out of his position -- but, on the whole, retrenchment and reliance on classic Kremlin tactics. On Tuesday, for instance, we saw the owner of the Kommersant publishing house (which publishes the most important Russian daily) fire one of his top executives and the editor of the political magazine Vlast over a photograph of a ballot on which someone had written, in red ink, "Putin, go fuck yourself!" Two other top editors resigned in protest.

The unmistakable feeling, watching all this, is that either the Kremlin knows nothing else, can think of nothing else, or is too panicked to find its thinking cap and slap it on. Asked if it was true that emergency meetings were convened in the Kremlin after the initial wave of protests, Putin said, dubiously, "I was not invited to these meetings, I don't know. I'll say honestly that I didn't notice any panic." He was, he added, busy. "I was at that time, speaking frankly, learning to play hockey," he said, referring to himself as "a cow on ice." "I wasn't really paying attention to what's going on there. And I haven't been there [in the Kremlin] for a while, frankly speaking."

Outside the Kremlin, however, Putin's insult-filled telethon had the unintended effect of galvanizing an opposition that had been showing signs of fracturing. During the Putin marathon on TV, RSVPs for the December 24 rally spiked on the Facebook page dedicated to it. Users barraged it with comments about how Putin's snide and anxious performance had pushed them over the edge.

And it's true that Putin had nothing but contempt for them. "Come to me, Bandar-logs," Russia's ruler told his perhaps befuddled viewers at one point in his bizarre show. Putin was comparing the newly energized opposition to the foolish, anarchic monkeys in "The Jungle Book." The ones who chant "We are great. We are free. We are wonderful." ("I've loved Kipling since childhood," crooned Putin.) Facebook did not take kindly to this. "What say you, Bandar-logs," one journalist quipped. "Shall we go prowling?"

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...utin?page=full

Last edited by shruthi_ks; December 16th, 2011 at 06:31 AM.
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  #12  
Old December 16th, 2011, 09:36 PM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

I guess both Putin and Manmohan may have been drugged in order to paralyse their thinking prowess and get them to do as people surrounding them say.
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Old December 17th, 2011, 08:31 AM
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Quote:
Originally Posted by shruthi_ks View Post
I guess both Putin and Manmohan may have been drugged in order to paralyse their thinking prowess and get them to do as people surrounding them say.
only ... MMS was born drugged. Also see he has that disease called Paa.
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Old December 17th, 2011, 08:59 AM
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

Putin's party thought that public can't see through exchange of power between Mededev and Putin, But yes, Putin was always good for russia

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Old January 13th, 2012, 07:41 AM
shruthi_ks shruthi_ks is offline
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Re: 'Putin's survival essential for India's survival'?

BBC News: Putin 'too busy' for presidential election debates

Vladimir Putin will not take part in Russian presidential election debates because of his duties as prime minister, his spokesman has announced.

Taking time off for debates would "undoubtedly impede his ability to duly carry out his duties", Dmitriy Peskov told Russian media.

Despite marathon TV chats and news conferences, the two-time president has never debated with challengers.

His Communist rivals have accused him of seeking an unfair advantage.

The party's leader, Gennady Zyuganov, said on Wednesday he should take leave as prime minister for the election period and engage in debates.

Mr Putin served two terms as president, from 2000 to 2008, but was constitutionally barred from standing for a third consecutive term.

Having served a single term as prime minister, he is standing again for the presidency on 4 March.

In his manifesto, posted on his campaign website on Thursday, Mr Putin vows to end police abuses in Russia and to make government accountable.

'Illegal' campaigning

Speaking to Interfax news agency, Mr Putin's spokesman said the prime minister would use the airtime allocated to him under electoral laws to convey his electoral programme to voters.

Furthermore, Mr Putin could nominate representatives to take part in debates for him, Mr Peskov added.

Mr Zyuganov, who has fought and lost presidential elections since the Yeltsin era and came a distant second against Dmitry Medvedev in 2008, said he wished to debate issues such as the economy, manufacturing, agriculture, science and education.

"Not only must [Vladimir Putin] go on leave, but also officially agree to take part in open political debates," he said in remarks broadcast on Russian news channel Rossiya 24.

One of Mr Zyuganov's MPs, Sergei Obukhov, accused Mr Putin of hogging TV coverage.

"In the last 20 days, Putin dominated the television screens 70 to 100%," he said.

"We believe this makes the election process illegal, as does Putin's continuing status of presidential candidate and prime minister."

'Repressive tendency'

Mr Putin's official duties as prime minister this week included chairing a meeting of Russian angling societies in Moscow on Wednesday.

In his manifesto, Mr Putin talks of "re-thinking the whole system of public security" and "needing to stop the extremely repressive tendency" of Russia's law enforcement agencies.

"This situation is deforming our society and is making it morally unhealthy," writes Mr Putin, a former secret police chief.

"The actions of the security forces should be aimed at protecting and supporting legal business - not fighting it."

On international affairs, Mr Putin promises to create "strong Russia in a complex world".

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/mobile/world-europe-16526026
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