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  #1  
Old July 8th, 2006, 06:37 PM
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Indian Navy still under British yoke

Look at the flags in this link....

http://www.fotw.net/flags/in^nav50.html

why hasn't Navy thrown off the English St.George flag??

Recall the red cross on white, St.George flag that English fans were waving to support the English soccer team..
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Old July 8th, 2006, 11:56 PM
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Smile Re: Indian Navy still under British yoke

Quote:
Originally Posted by dhurandhar
Look at the flags in this link....

http://www.fotw.net/flags/in^nav50.html

why hasn't Navy thrown off the English St.George flag??

Recall the red cross on white, St.George flag that English fans were waving to support the English soccer team..
it has.
from Aug 15, 2001 onwards! read this:

<- Old Flag || New Flag->

Quote:
All commissioned Indian Naval Ships, Submarines and Shore Establishments fly the Indian Naval Ensign. After January 26, 1950, the ships and submarines of the Indian Navy displayed the Indian Naval Ensign. This Ensign was white in colour, divided into four parts by a Red Cross and had the Indian Flag in its left quarter. From 15th August 2001, Indian Naval Ships, Submarines and Shore Establishments are now adorned with a new Indian Naval Ensign. The present design of the Ensign was made keeping in mind simplicity, commonality of the Ensign with the two other Services and the use of white and Navy blue colours which are traditional to the Navy. The new Naval Ensign now displays the National Flag at the left, top corner and a Navy Anchor with the National Crest above it in Navy Blue. In addition, the Naval Ensign is also flown at the shore Headquarters of a ship or senior officer, at detach Naval Establishments. Naval Ensign can also be flown at Naval Recruiting Office with the permission of Naval Headquarters. Besides, Inter-service establishments like National Defence College, New Delhi, National Defence Academy, Khadakvasala, Defence Service Staff College, Wellington and College of Defence Management, Secunderabad are also authorised to fly the Naval Ensign.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...navy-intro.htm
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Last edited by rameshp; July 8th, 2006 at 11:58 PM.
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Old July 9th, 2006, 12:27 AM
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Thumbs up Re: Indian Navy still under British yoke

Dhruu pai, since your query has been answered, i hope you dont mind me doing this.

lets use this thread for informing eCharchans about their navy and its capabilities:


Indian Navy




The Indian Navy (IN), the world’s fifth largest navy, is a well-balanced three-dimensional force consisting of sophisticated missile-capable warships, aircraft carriers, minesweepers, advanced submarines and the latest aircraft in its inventory. Many of the warships are of indigenous design and have been constructed in Indian shipyards. These ships compare well with the ships of similar capability constructed by advanced countries. The Naval forces are maintained and supported by modern dockyard facilities encompassing state-of-the-art technology. At present the Navy has two major Naval bases at Mumbai and Visakhapatnam.
The navy is relatively well-armed among Indian Ocean navies, operating one aircraft carrier, over 40 surface combatants, and over a dozen submarines. The fleet is aging, and replacement of ships and aircraft has not been adequately funded. India's coast guard is small and is organized along the lines of the U.S. Coast Guard. With India's long coastline and extensive Exclusive Economic Zone, the navy and coast guard work hard to patrol the waters dictated by India's economic and strategic interests.

The Navy consists of ships such as aircraft carrier, cruisers, destroyers, frigates, mine-sweepers, survey ships, store carriers, tankers, submarines etc., and shore establishments, such as training institutions, dockyard, storage deposits and other miscellaneous, technical and administrative establishments. It also has a separate Aviation Wing consisting of Naval Air Stations and a Fleet Requirement Unit. The training establishments cater for the training of new entry Sailors, apprentices and boys as well as for specialised training of officers and men in mechanical and electrical engineering, gunnery, communication, navigation, anti-submarine and naval aviation etc,. There are also schools for training in seamanship, physical culture, supply and secretariat duties, etc.

India entered the 21st Century with a small but formidable regional naval posture. Long considered a "blue water" navy, the Indian Navy faces major challenges as many of its major vessels near the end of their service lives. Indigenous shipbuilding efforts are struggling to achieve acceptable levels of productivity and efficiency.
A “banner year” for bilateral training exercises, 2003 will likely be a model for future exercise planning. As a U.S. partner in the war on terrorism, the IN did little this year other than bilateral training exercises to bolster anti–terrorism efforts.

After several years of meticulous preparation, by 2003 the outlines of a new operational philosophy of the Indian Navy were becoming increasingly perceptible. This is an operational philosophy whose contours are well suited to the current perception of the Indian Navy - that of a competent, confident, operationally viable and regionally visible maritime power. Ships of the Indian Navy are not merely visible in the Indian Ocean Region and its environs - but also further afield.

In keeping with the 2003 naval slogan, the Indian Navy is indeed "Tacking to the Blue Waters". "Tacking" is a sailing term, indicating a change of direction of a sailing vessel. "Blue Waters" is a common maritime term implying deep seas, far away from one's own shores.

In keeping with this change in thrust and direction, Indian Naval ships are demonstrating the Navy's emergence as a regionally viable stabilising force. For Instance, in April of this year, the active assistance of the Indian Navy was requested by the Republic of Mauritius - 2,500 nautical miles away - to tow their Coast Guard Vessel Vigilante to Mumbai for repairs at the Naval Dockyard. This arduous and professionally challenging task was flawlessly executed by INS Gaj. In recognition of the demonstrated capability of the Indian Navy, the Government of Mauritius additionally requested surveillance of its Exclusive Economic Zone. First, INS Sharda, and now, INS Suvarna, maintained presence in the area, sharing with them information of importance.

Similarly, in June 2003, INS Ranjit and INS Suvarna executed a month-long deployment in and off Maputo, the capital of Mozambique - over 3,500 nautical miles away from India. This was at the specific request of the Government of Mozambique to provide security and training assistance.
Closer home, responding to a call, by the Government of Sri Lanka in mid-May 2003 for Indian assistances in providing succour to the flood-stricken southern and central districts of the country, the swiftness and comprehensiveness of the response by INS Sharda were instrumental in showing that a friend in need is a friend indeed.

Indian Naval ships were visible in or headed for the eastern choke points of the Indian Ocean, building professional partnerships with other navies of South East Asia, IN ships Rajput and Rana renewed contacts with old friends in Singapore, as well INS Mumbai with the Indonesian Navy.
Farther out still, the three masted sail training barque INS Tarangini proudly bore the Indian flag as far away as Canada and the US, carrying through the Great Lakes India's desire and, ability to build bridges of friendship across the seas. After taking part in tall ship races, she will transit the Panama Canal, cross the Pacific and return home.

For the Indian Navy, "Bridges of Friendship Across the Seas" had a particular relevance, for it knows that it is the sea itself that is the bridge - and the Indian Navy is determined to travel upon this bridge, reaching across to its maritime neighbours intimately connected by the sea, no matter where in the world they are.

Following the 28 December 2004 tsunami, rescue and relief operations under taken by Andaman and Nicobar Command included intensive search and rescue for survivers by Marine Commandos of Indian Navy at Indira Point light house and adjoining areas. Indian Naval Ships Brahmaputra with its two chetak helicopters, Sandhayak with one chetak helicopter, Darshak with one chetak helicopter, Jyoti, Trinket, Sharabh and LCU- 38 operated off Great Nicobar Island and Nancowry group of islands. INS Rajput with chetak helicopter on board operated off Car Nicobar whereas Indian Naval Ships Magar, Kumbhir, LCU- 35 and LCU- 36 were deployed off Hut Bay. Helicopters on board INS Brahmaputra carried out aerial recce of Pilomilo, Pilobabi, Pilokunji and Kyang Island along with tribal captain.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/milita...navy-intro.htm
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  #4  
Old January 7th, 2017, 07:42 PM
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Re: Indian Navy still under British yoke

Indian Navy to get 100 warships next year



Posted on December 31, 2016







Bhubaneswar: The Garden Reach Shipbuilders and Engineers Limited (GRSE) have promised to deliver 100 warships to Indian Navy in February-March 2017. It will become the first shipbuilding yard to do so in the entire country.
“Next year in February-March, we will deliver our 100 warships. This is a rare distinction for a shipbuilding yard as we will be the first shipbuilding yard of the country which has manufactured 100 warships, apart from 700 vessels,” GRSEs CMD Rear Admiral (retd) A K Verma told reporters.
The GRSE has delivered 15 warships and launched 18 vessels in the last five years. It is also the first to export a completely indigenously built Indian CGS Barracuda to Mauritius. It has also delivered INS Kamorta and INS Kadmatt to Indian navy.
GRSE which is a premier warship manufacturing company in the country under the administrative control of Ministry of Defence has been modernized and the capacity of the shipyard has been enhanced to undertake construction of 14 ships, official said.




http://pragativadi.com/indian-navy-g...ips-next-year/





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